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Electronics Symentics


Career in Electronics Engineers in USA

In the 1700s, Benjamin Franklin, Alessandro Volta, Luigi Galvani, and other early thinkers sought to understand the nature of an unseen, unnamed energy. Their test materials consisted of such things as kites, frogs' legs, zinc, and salt water. But their findings allowed pioneers in the 18OOs--Ampere, Faraday, Ohm, and Oersted--to discover the electrical properties known as charge, resistance, potential, and current, and the dynamics among them.

Within the next hundred years, Charles Wheatstone and Samuel F. B. Morse had developed electrical communication, resulting in networks of telegraph lines over land and under the sea. The telephone was beginning to transform the concept of communication within cities, while Edison's incandescent light shone in factories, stores, schools, and homes. In 1904 John Ambrose Fleming's diode tube harnessed the electron in a revolutionary way. Electronics was born.

As the heirs to Faraday's and Flemings work, today's electrical, electronics, and computer engineers, technologists, and technicians continue to revolutionize the way we live. We depend on the hundreds of thousands of these individuals who design, produce, operate and maintain a vast array of equipment and services.

Radio, television, telephones, computers, airplanes, space vehicles, automobiles, refrigerators and heaters, office machinery and home appliances, life-saving medical equipment and Martian battles fought with joysticks represent a mere sampling of the now familiar facets of life made possible by engineers, technologists and technicians. In our age of satellite-transmitted television and transcontinental computer networks, the challenges and opportunities in this dedicated profession continue to mushroom. Today's careers, like electricity itself, have enormous potential.

The implementation of ideas through new products, systems, and services is the essence of engineering as a socially responsible profession. The rapid changes in electrical, electronics, and computer technology and the diversity of applications require a broad educational background and a lifelong commitment to learning new and specialized information.

This brochure describes some of the many challenging careers in electrical, electronics, and computer engineering and the educational path necessary to become an engineer, technologist, or technician. Whether you're a student, faculty advisor, or parent, this information will help you make sound decisions about a lifetime pursuit.





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